Review: Hounded by Kevin Hearne


Atticus O’Sullivan lives in Tempe, Arizona where he usually only has to contend with Coyote’s mischievous laughter. He chose this place because the Fae are less likely to be able to reach him. He works in his joint book and apothecary store and has an Irish Wolfhound named Oberon. He is also 2,100 years old and looks 21.

houndedHounded by Kevin Hearne

Published: May 3rd 2011 by Del Rey
Format/Source: Review copy from Goodreads’ giveaway
Genre: Urban fantasy
Pages: 304

Synopsis:

The first novel in an original, back-to-back three-book series The Iron Druid Chronicles introducing a cool, new, funny urban fantasy hero.

Atticus O’Sullivan, last of the Druids, lives peacefully in Arizona, running an occult bookshop and shape-shifting in his spare time to hunt with his Irish wolfhound. His neighbors and customers think that this handsome, tattooed Irish dude is about twenty-one years old when in actuality, he’s twenty-one centuries old. Not to mention: He draws his power from the earth, possesses a sharp wit, and wields an even sharper magical sword known as Fragarach, the Answerer.

Unfortunately, a very angry Celtic god wants that sword, and he’s hounded Atticus for centuries. Now the determined deity has tracked him down, and Atticus will need all his power plus the help of a seductive goddess of death, his vampire and werewolf team of attorneys, a sexy bartender possessed by a Hindu witch, and some good old-fashioned luck of the Irish to kick some Celtic arse and deliver himself from evil.

Review:

jokers5

 

Atticus O’Sullivan lives in Tempe, Arizona where he usually only has to contend with Coyote’s mischievous laughter. He chose this place because the Fae are less likely to be able to reach him. He works in his joint book and apothecary store and has an Irish Wolfhound named Oberon. He is also 2,100 years old and looks 21.

Atticus is a Druid. He draw his power from the earth, which he has been traveling extensively for many years, never staying in one place for too long. Because if he does, he is soon tracked by Aengus d’Og, the Irish God of Love who is far from being a cupid. But Atticus might take a stand this time, to face the threat of various gods, creatures, witches, and powers.

I loved this book. Every god from different beliefs are real, brought to life by people’s belief in them as well as perhaps as the foundation of the faith stories themselves. In this regard, I was reminded of Gaiman’s American Gods (a book that while I appreciate the premise, just couldn’t get through it, so it’s possible that is an incorrect comparison). It was definitely urban fantasy; for despite Atticus’s age, he is a nice combination of age, wisdom, and yet moves with the times.

The kind of magic and the take on Irish mythology/religion reminded me of The Hounds of the Morrigan, one of my favorite books. It was cool to see a different way of imagining Morrigan and the kind of magic wielded by that belief set.

Humor was spot on in this book. Most reviews sample an excerpt from Oberon’s conversations with Atticus. Needless to say, I found myself interrupting my boyfriend on different occasions to read out parts of the conversation. Like when Oberon wants to be Atilla the Hun. It saved the book from taking itself too seriously while not going to far off the deep end of humor to make it ridiculous.

I look forward to reading the other books in the series.

jokerssig

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